bpy api - add new page for best-practice (so Thomas has something to point to when...
[blender.git] / doc / python_api / rst / info_quickstart.rst
1 ***********************
2 Quickstart Introduction
3 ***********************
4
5 Intro
6 =====
7
8 This API is generally stable but some areas are still being added and improved.
9
10 The Blender/Python API can do the following:
11
12 * Edit any data the user interface can (Scenes, Meshes, Particles etc.)
13
14 * Modify user preferences, keymaps and themes
15
16 * Run tools with own settings
17
18 * Create user interface elements such as menus, headers and panels
19
20 * Create new tools
21
22 * Create interactive tools
23
24 * Create new rendering engines that integrate with Blender
25
26 * Define new settings in existing Blender data
27
28 * Draw in the 3D view using OpenGL commands from Python
29
30
31 The Blender/Python API **can't** (yet)...
32
33 * Create new space types.
34
35 * Assign custom properties to every type.
36
37 * Define callbacks or listeners to be notified when data is changed.
38
39
40 Before Starting
41 ===============
42
43 This document isn't intended to fully cover each topic. Rather, its purpose is to familiarize you with Blender 2.5's new Python API.
44
45
46 A quick list of helpful things to know before starting:
47
48 * Blender uses Python 3.x; some 3rd party extensions are not available yet.
49
50 * The interactive console in Blender 2.5 has been improved; testing one-liners in the console is a good way to learn.
51
52 * Button tool tips show Python attributes and operator names.
53
54 * Right clicking on buttons and menu items directly links to API documentation.
55
56 * For more examples, the text menu has a templates section where some example operators can be found.
57
58 * To examine further scripts distributed with Blender, see ``~/.blender/scripts/startup/bl_ui`` for the user interface and ``~/.blender/scripts/startup/bl_op`` for operators.
59
60
61 Key Concepts
62 ============
63
64 Data Access
65 -----------
66
67 Accessing datablocks
68 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
69
70 Python accesses Blender's data in the same way as the animation system and user interface, which means any setting that is changed via a button can also be changed from Python.
71
72 Accessing data from the currently loaded blend file is done with the module :mod:`bpy.data`. This gives access to library data. For example:
73
74    >>> bpy.data.objects
75    <bpy_collection[3], BlendDataObjects>
76
77    >>> bpy.data.scenes
78    <bpy_collection[1], BlendDataScenes>
79
80    >>> bpy.data.materials
81    <bpy_collection[1], BlendDataMaterials>
82
83
84 About Collections
85 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
86
87 You'll notice that an index as well as a string can be used to access members of the collection.
88
89 Unlike Python's dictionaries, both methods are acceptable; however, the index of a member may change while running Blender.
90
91    >>> list(bpy.data.objects)
92    [bpy.data.objects["Cube"], bpy.data.objects["Plane"]]
93
94    >>> bpy.data.objects['Cube']
95    bpy.data.objects["Cube"]
96
97    >>> bpy.data.objects[0]
98    bpy.data.objects["Cube"]
99
100
101 Accessing attributes
102 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
103
104 Once you have a data block such as a material, object, groups etc. its attributes can be accessed just like changing a setting in the interface; in fact, the button tooltip also displays the Python attribute which can help in finding what settings to change in a script.
105
106    >>> bpy.data.objects[0].name 
107    'Camera'
108
109    >>> bpy.data.scenes["Scene"]
110    bpy.data.scenes['Scene']
111
112    >>> bpy.data.materials.new("MyMaterial")
113    bpy.data.materials['MyMaterial']
114
115
116 For testing what data to access it's useful to use the "Console", which is its own space type in Blender 2.5. This supports auto-complete, giving you a fast way to dig into different data in your file.
117
118 Example of a data path that can be quickly found via the console:
119
120    >>> bpy.data.scenes[0].render.resolution_percentage
121    100
122    >>> bpy.data.scenes[0].objects["Torus"].data.vertices[0].co.x
123    1.0
124
125
126 Custom Properties
127 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
128
129 Python can access properties on any datablock that has an ID (data that can be linked in and accessed from :mod:`bpy.data`. When assigning a property, you can make up your own names, these will be created when needed or overwritten if they exist.
130
131 This data is saved with the blend file and copied with objects.
132
133 Example:
134
135 .. code-block:: python
136
137    bpy.context.object["MyOwnProperty"] = 42
138
139    if "SomeProp" in bpy.context.object:
140        print("Property found")
141
142    # Use the get function like a python dictionary
143    # which can have a fallback value.
144    value = bpy.data.scenes["Scene"].get("test_prop", "fallback value")
145
146    # dictionaries can be assigned as long as they only use basic types.
147    group = bpy.data.groups.new("MyTestGroup")
148    group["GameSettings"] = {"foo": 10, "bar": "spam", "baz": {}}
149
150    del group["GameSettings"]
151
152
153 Note that these properties can only be assigned  basic Python types.
154
155 * int, float, string
156
157 * array of ints/floats
158
159 * dictionary (only string keys are supported, values must be basic types too)
160
161 These properties are valid outside of Python. They can be animated by curves or used in driver paths.
162
163
164 Context
165 -------
166
167 While it's useful to be able to access data directly by name or as a list, it's more common to operate on the user's selection. The context is always available from '''bpy.context''' and can be used to get the active object, scene, tool settings along with many other attributes.
168
169 Common-use cases:
170
171    >>> bpy.context.object
172    >>> bpy.context.selected_objects
173    >>> bpy.context.visible_bones
174
175 Note that the context is read-only. These values cannot be modified directly, though they may be changed by running API functions or by using the data API.
176
177 So ``bpy.context.object = obj`` will raise an error.
178
179 But ``bpy.context.scene.objects.active = obj`` will work as expected.
180
181
182 The context attributes change depending on where it is accessed. The 3D view has different context members to the Console, so take care when accessing context attributes that the user state is known.
183
184 See :mod:`bpy.context` API reference
185
186
187 Operators (Tools)
188 -----------------
189
190 Operators are tools generally accessed by the user from buttons, menu items or key shortcuts. From the user perspective they are a tool but Python can run these with its own settings through the :mod:`bpy.ops` module.
191
192 Examples:
193
194    >>> bpy.ops.mesh.flip_normals()
195    {'FINISHED'}
196    >>> bpy.ops.mesh.hide(unselected=False)
197    {'FINISHED'}
198    >>> bpy.ops.object.scale_apply()
199    {'FINISHED'}
200
201 .. note::
202
203    The menu item: Help -> Operator Cheat Sheet" gives a list of all operators and their default values in Python syntax, along with the generated docs. This is a good way to get an overview of all blender's operators.
204
205
206 Operator Poll()
207 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
208
209 Many operators have a "poll" function which may check that the mouse is a valid area or that the object is in the correct mode (Edit Mode, Weight Paint etc). When an operator's poll function fails within python, an exception is raised.
210
211 For example, calling bpy.ops.view3d.render_border() from the console raises the following error:
212
213 .. code-block:: python
214
215    RuntimeError: Operator bpy.ops.view3d.render_border.poll() failed, context is incorrect
216
217 In this case the context must be the 3d view with an active camera.
218
219 To avoid using try/except clauses wherever operators are called you can call the operators own .poll() function to check if it can run in the current context.
220
221 .. code-block:: python
222
223    if bpy.ops.view3d.render_border.poll():
224        bpy.ops.view3d.render_border()
225
226
227 Integration
228 ===========
229
230 Python scripts can integrate with Blender in the following ways:
231
232 * By defining a rendering engine.
233
234 * By defining operators.
235
236 * By defining menus, headers and panels.
237
238 * By inserting new buttons into existing menus, headers and panels
239
240
241 In Python, this is done by defining a class, which is a subclass of an existing type.
242
243
244 Example Operator
245 ----------------
246
247 .. literalinclude:: ../../../release/scripts/templates/operator_simple.py
248
249 Once this script runs, ``SimpleOperator`` is registered with Blender and can be called from the operator search popup or added to the toolbar.
250
251 To run the script:
252
253 #. Highlight the above code then press Ctrl+C to copy it.
254
255 #. Start Blender
256
257 #. Press Ctrl+Right twice to change to the Scripting layout.
258
259 #. Press Ctrl+V to paste the code into the text panel (the upper left frame).
260
261 #. Click on the button **Run Script**.
262
263 #. Move you're mouse into the 3D view, press spacebar for the operator search
264    menu, and type "Simple".
265
266 #. Click on the "Simple Operator" item found in search.
267
268
269 .. seealso:: The class members with the **bl_** prefix are documented in the API
270    reference :class:`bpy.types.Operator`
271
272
273 Example Panel
274 -------------
275
276 Panels register themselves as a class, like an operator. Notice the extra **bl_** variables used to set the context they display in.
277
278 .. literalinclude:: ../../../release/scripts/templates/ui_panel_simple.py
279
280 To run the script:
281
282 #. Highlight the above code then press Ctrl+C to copy it
283
284 #. Start Blender
285
286 #. Press Ctrl+Right twice to change to the Scripting layout
287
288 #. Press Ctrl+V to paste the code into the text panel (the upper left frame)
289
290 #. Click on the button **Run Script**.
291
292
293 To view the results:
294
295 #. Select the the default cube.
296
297 #. Click on the Object properties icon in the buttons panel (far right; appears as a tiny cube).
298
299 #. Scroll down to see a panel named **Hello World Panel**.
300
301 #. Changing the object name also updates **Hello World Panel's** Name: field.
302
303 Note the row distribution and the label and properties that are available through the code.
304
305 .. seealso:: :class:`bpy.types.Panel`
306
307
308 Types
309 =====
310
311 Blender defines a number of Python types but also uses Python native types.
312
313 Blender's Python API can be split up into 3 categories. 
314
315
316 Native Types
317 ------------
318
319 In simple cases returning a number or a string as a custom type would be cumbersome, so these are accessed as normal python types.
320
321 * blender float/int/boolean -> float/int/boolean
322
323 * blender enumerator -> string
324
325      >>> C.object.rotation_mode = 'AXIS_ANGLE'
326
327
328 * blender enumerator (multiple) -> set of strings
329
330   .. code-block:: python
331
332      # setting multiple camera overlay guides
333      bpy.context.scene.camera.data.show_guide = {'GOLDEN', 'CENTER'}
334
335      # passing as an operator argument for report types
336      self.report({'WARNING', 'INFO'}, "Some message!")
337
338
339 Internal Types
340 --------------
341
342 Used for Blender datablocks and collections: :class:`bpy.types.bpy_struct`
343
344 For data that contains its own attributes groups/meshes/bones/scenes... etc.
345
346 There are 2 main types that wrap Blenders data, one for datablocks (known internally as bpy_struct), another for properties.
347
348    >>> bpy.context.object
349    bpy.data.objects['Cube']
350
351    >>> C.scene.objects
352    bpy.data.scenes['Scene'].objects
353
354 Note that these types reference Blender's data so modifying them is immediately visible.
355
356
357 Mathutils Types
358 ---------------
359
360 Used for vectors, quaternion, eulers, matrix and color types, accessible from :mod:`mathutils`
361
362 Some attributes such as :class:`bpy.types.Object.location`, :class:`bpy.types.PoseBone.rotation_euler` and :class:`bpy.types.Scene.cursor_location` can be accessed as special math types which can be used together and manipulated in various useful ways.
363
364 Example of a matrix, vector multiplication:
365
366 .. code-block:: python
367
368    bpy.context.object.matrix_world * bpy.context.object.data.verts[0].co
369
370 .. note::
371
372    mathutils types keep a reference to Blender's internal data so changes can
373    be applied back.
374
375
376    Example:
377
378    .. code-block:: python
379
380       # modifies the Z axis in place.
381       bpy.context.object.location.z += 2.0
382
383       # location variable holds a reference to the object too.
384       location = bpy.context.object.location
385       location *= 2.0
386
387       # Copying the value drops the reference so the value can be passed to
388       # functions and modified without unwanted side effects.
389       location = bpy.context.object.location.copy()
390
391
392 Animation
393 =========
394
395 There are 2 ways to add keyframes through Python.
396
397 The first is through key properties directly, which is similar to inserting a keyframe from the button as a user. You can also manually create the curves and keyframe data, then set the path to the property. Here are examples of both methods.
398
399 Both examples insert a keyframe on the active object's Z axis.
400
401 Simple example:
402
403 .. code-block:: python
404
405    obj = bpy.context.object
406    obj.location[2] = 0.0
407    obj.keyframe_insert(data_path="location", frame=10.0, index=2)
408    obj.location[2] = 1.0
409    obj.keyframe_insert(data_path="location", frame=20.0, index=2)
410
411 Using Low-Level Functions:
412
413 .. code-block:: python
414
415    obj = bpy.context.object
416    obj.animation_data_create()
417    obj.animation_data.action = bpy.data.actions.new(name="MyAction")
418    fcu_z = obj.animation_data.action.fcurves.new(data_path="location", index=2)
419    fcu_z.keyframe_points.add(2)
420    fcu_z.keyframe_points[0].co = 10.0, 0.0
421    fcu_z.keyframe_points[1].co = 20.0, 1.0
422