document some of the pitfalls in the blender python api (taken from frequent mails...
[blender.git] / doc / python_api / rst / info_gotcha.rst
1 ########
2 Gotcha's
3 ########
4
5 This document attempts to help you work with the Blender API in areas that can be troublesome and avoid practices that are known to give instability.
6
7 ***************
8 Using Operators
9 ***************
10
11 Blender's operators are tools for users to access, that python can access them too is very useful but does not change the fact that operators have limitations that can make them cumbersome to script.
12
13 Main limits are...
14
15 * Can't pass data such as objects, meshes or materials to operate on (operators use the context instead)
16
17 * The return value from calling an operator gives the success (if it finished or was canceled),
18   in some cases it would be more logical from an API perspective to return the result of the operation.
19
20 * Operators poll function can fail where an API function would raise an exception giving details on exactly why.
21
22 =================================
23 Why does an operator's poll fail?
24 =================================
25
26 When calling an operator gives an error like this:
27
28 .. code-block:: python
29
30    >>> bpy.ops.action.clean(threshold=0.001)
31    Traceback (most recent call last):
32      File "<blender_console>", line 1, in <module>
33      File "scripts/modules/bpy/ops.py", line 179, in __call__
34        ret = op_call(self.idname_py(), None, kw)
35    RuntimeError: Operator bpy.ops.action.clean.poll() failed, context is incorrect
36
37 Which raises the question as to what the correct context might be?
38
39 Typically operators check for the active area type, a selection or active object they can operate on, but some operators are more picky about when they run.
40
41 In most cases you can figure out what context an operator needs simply be seeing how its used in Blender and thinking about what it does.
42
43
44 Unfortunately if you're still stuck - the only way to **really** know whats going on is to read the source code for the poll function and see what its checking.
45
46 For python operators its not so hard to find the source since its included with with Blender and the source file/line is included in the operator reference docs.
47
48 Downloading and searching the C code isn't so simple, especially if you're not familiar with the C language but by searching the operator name or description you should be able to find the poll function with no knowledge of C.
49
50 .. note::
51
52    Blender does have the functionality for poll functions to describe why they fail, but its currently not used much, if you're interested to help improve our API feel free to add calls to ``CTX_wm_operator_poll_msg_set`` where its not obvious why poll fails.
53
54    .. code-block:: python
55
56       >>> bpy.ops.gpencil.draw()
57       RuntimeError: Operator bpy.ops.gpencil.draw.poll() Failed to find Grease Pencil data to draw into
58
59 ================================
60 The operator still doesn't work!
61 ================================
62
63 Certain operators in Blender are only intended for use in a specific context, some operators for example are only called from the properties window where they check the current material, modifier or constraint.
64
65 Examples of this are:
66
67 * :mod:`bpy.ops.texture.slot_move`
68 * :mod:`bpy.ops.constraint.limitdistance_reset`
69 * :mod:`bpy.ops.object.modifier_copy`
70 * :mod:`bpy.ops.buttons.file_browse`
71
72 Another possibility is that you are the first person to attempt to use this operator in a script and some modifications need to be made to the operator to run in a different context, if the operator should logically be able to run but fails when accessed from a script it should be reported to the bug tracker.
73
74
75 **********
76 Stale Data
77 **********
78
79 ===============================
80 No updates after setting values
81 ===============================
82
83 Sometimes you want to modify values from python and immediately access the updated values, eg:
84
85 Once changing the objects :class:`Object.location` you may want to access its transformation right after from :class:`Object.matrix_world`, but this doesn't work as you might expect.
86
87 Consider the calculations that might go into working out the objects final transformation, this includes:
88
89 * animation function curves.
90 * drivers and their pythons expressions.
91 * constraints
92 * parent objects and all of their f-curves, constraints etc.
93
94 To avoid expensive recalculations every time a property is modified, Blender defers making the actual calculations until they are needed.
95
96 However, while the script runs you may want to access the updated values.
97
98 This can be done by calling :class:`bpy.types.Scene.update` after modifying values which recalculates all data that is tagged to be updated.
99
100 ===============================
101 Can I redraw during the script?
102 ===============================
103
104 The official answer to this is no, or... *"You don't want to do that"*.
105
106 To give some background on the topic...
107
108 While a script executes Blender waits for it to finish and is effectively locked until its done, while in this state Blender won't redraw or respond to user input.
109 Normally this is not such a problem because scripts distributed with Blender tend not to run for an extended period of time, nevertheless scripts *can* take ages to execute and its nice to see whats going on in the view port.
110
111 Tools that lock Blender in a loop and redraw are highly discouraged since they conflict with Blenders ability to run multiple operators at once and update different parts of the interface as the tool runs.
112
113 So the solution here is to write a **modal** operator, that is - an operator which defines a modal() function, See the modal operator template in the text  editor.
114
115 Modal operators execute on user input or setup their own timers to run frequently, they can handle the events or pass through to be handled by the keymap or other modal operators.
116
117 Transform, Painting, Fly-Mode and File-Select are example of a modal operators.
118
119 Writing modal operators takes more effort then a simple ``for`` loop that happens to redraw but is more flexible and integrates better with Blenders design.
120
121
122 **Ok, Ok! I still want to draw from python**
123
124 If you insist - yes its possible, but scripts that use this hack wont be considered for inclusion in Blender and any issues with using it wont be considered bugs, this is also not guaranteed to work in future releases.
125
126 .. code-block:: python
127
128    bpy.ops.wm.redraw_timer(type='DRAW_WIN_SWAP', iterations=1)
129
130
131 ***************************************
132 Strange errors using 'threading' module
133 ***************************************
134
135 Python threading with Blender only works properly when the threads finish up before the script does. By using ``threading.join()`` for example.
136
137 Heres an example of threading supported by Blender:
138
139 .. code-block:: python
140
141    import threading
142    import time
143
144    def prod():
145        print(threading.current_thread().name, "Starting")
146
147        # do something vaguely useful
148        import bpy
149        from mathutils import Vector
150        from random import random
151
152        prod_vec = Vector((random() - 0.5, random() - 0.5, random() - 0.5))
153        print("Prodding", prod_vec)
154        bpy.data.objects["Cube"].location += prod_vec
155        time.sleep(random() + 1.0)
156        # finish
157
158        print(threading.current_thread().name, "Exiting")
159
160    threads = [threading.Thread(name="Prod %d" % i, target=prod) for i in range(10)]
161
162
163    print("Starting threads...")
164
165    for t in threads:
166        t.start()
167
168    print("Waiting for threads to finish...")
169
170    for t in threads:
171        t.join()
172
173
174 This an example of a timer which runs many times a second and moves the default cube continuously while Blender runs (Unsupported).
175
176 .. code-block:: python
177
178    def func():
179        print("Running...")
180        import bpy
181        bpy.data.objects['Cube'].location.x += 0.05
182
183    def my_timer():
184        from threading import Timer
185        t = Timer(0.1, my_timer)
186        t.start()
187        func()
188
189    my_timer()
190
191 Use cases like the one above which leave the thread running once the script finishes may seem to work for a while but end up causing random crashes or errors in Blenders own drawing code.
192
193 So far no work has gone into making Blenders python integration thread safe, so until its properly supported, best not make use of this.
194
195 .. note::
196
197    Pythons threads only allow co-currency and wont speed up you're scripts on multi-processor systems, the ``subprocess`` and ``multiprocess`` modules can be used with blender and make use of multiple CPU's too.
198
199
200 ******************************
201 Matrix multiplication is wrong
202 ******************************
203
204 Every so often we get complaints that Blenders matrix math is wrong, the confusion comes from mathutils matrices being column-major to match OpenGL and the rest of Blenders matrix operations and stored matrix data.
205
206 This is different to **numpy** which is row-major which matches what you would expect when using conventional matrix math notation.
207
208
209 ***********************************
210 I can't edit the mesh in edit-mode!
211 ***********************************
212
213 Blenders EditMesh is an internal data structure (not saved and not exposed to python), this gives the main annoyance that you need to exit edit-mode to edit the mesh from python.
214
215 The reason we have not made much attempt to fix this yet is because we
216 will likely move to BMesh mesh API eventually, so any work on the API now will be wasted effort.
217
218 With the BMesh API we may expose mesh data to python so we can
219 write useful tools in python which are also fast to execute while in edit-mode.
220
221 For the time being this limitation just has to be worked around but we're aware its frustrating needs to be addressed.
222
223
224 *******************************
225 Help! My script crashes Blender
226 *******************************
227
228 Ideally it would be impossible to crash Blender from python however there are some problems with the API where it can be made to crash.
229
230 Strictly speaking this is a bug in the API but fixing it would mean adding memory verification on every access since most crashes are caused by the python objects referencing Blenders memory directly, whenever the memory is freed, further python access to it can crash the script. But fixing this would make the scripts run very slow, or writing a very different kind of API which doesn't reference the memory directly.
231
232 Here are some general hints to avoid running into these problems.
233
234 * Be aware of memory limits, especially when working with large lists since Blender can crash simply by running out of memory.
235
236 * Many hard to fix crashes end up being because of referencing freed data, when removing data be sure not to hold any references to it.
237
238 * Modules or classes that remain active while Blender is used, should not hold references to data the user may remove, instead, fetch data from the context each time the script is activated.
239
240 * Crashes may not happen every time, they may happen more on some configurations/operating-systems.
241
242
243 =========
244 Undo/Redo
245 =========
246
247 Undo invalidates all :class:`bpy.types.ID` instances (Object, Scene, Mesh etc).
248
249 This example shows how you can tell undo changes the memory locations.
250
251 .. code-block:: python
252
253    >>> hash(bpy.context.object)
254    -9223372036849950810
255    >>> hash(bpy.context.object)
256    -9223372036849950810
257
258    # ... move the active object, then undo
259
260    >>> hash(bpy.context.object)
261    -9223372036849951740
262
263 As suggested above, simply not holding references to data when Blender is used interactively by the user is the only way to ensure the script doesn't become unstable.
264
265
266 ===================
267 Array Re-Allocation
268 ===================
269
270 When adding new points to a curve or vertices's/edges/faces to a mesh, internally the array which stores this data is re-allocated.
271
272 .. code-block:: python
273
274    bpy.ops.curve.primitive_bezier_curve_add()
275    point = bpy.context.object.data.splines[0].bezier_points[0]
276    bpy.context.object.data.splines[0].bezier_points.add()
277
278    # this will crash!
279    point.co = 1.0, 2.0, 3.0
280
281 This can be avoided by re-assigning the point variables after adding the new one or by storing indices's to the points rather then the points themselves.
282
283 The best way is to sidestep the problem altogether add all the points to the curve at once. This means you don't have to worry about array re-allocation and its faster too since reallocating the entire array for every point added is inefficient.
284
285
286 =============
287 Removing Data
288 =============
289
290 **Any** data that you remove shouldn't be modified or accessed afterwards, this includes f-curves, drivers, render layers, timeline markers, modifiers, constraints along with objects, scenes, groups, bones.. etc.
291
292 This is a problem in the API at the moment that we should eventually solve.