Correct use of your vs you're in py api docs
authorCampbell Barton <ideasman42@gmail.com>
Wed, 4 Jan 2012 03:22:37 +0000 (03:22 +0000)
committerCampbell Barton <ideasman42@gmail.com>
Wed, 4 Jan 2012 03:22:37 +0000 (03:22 +0000)
doc/python_api/rst/info_best_practice.rst
doc/python_api/rst/info_quickstart.rst
doc/python_api/rst/info_tips_and_tricks.rst

index f4daed9ad9f0f54159a972240259d3091693368b..9e310711bf3d636b73045bd350fc737e49bb5fef 100644 (file)
@@ -2,9 +2,9 @@
 Best Practice
 *************
 
-When writing you're own scripts python is great for new developers to pick up and become productive, but you can also pick up odd habits or at least write scripts that are not easy for others to understand.
+When writing your own scripts python is great for new developers to pick up and become productive, but you can also pick up odd habits or at least write scripts that are not easy for others to understand.
 
-For you're own work this is of course fine, but if you want to collaborate with others or have you're work included with blender there are practices we encourage.
+For your own work this is of course fine, but if you want to collaborate with others or have your work included with blender there are practices we encourage.
 
 
 Style Conventions
@@ -244,7 +244,7 @@ Use ``float(string)`` rather than ``eval(string)``, if you know the value will b
 Checking String Start/End
 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
 
-If your checking the start of a string for a keyword, rather than...
+If you're checking the start of a string for a keyword, rather than...
 
 >>> if line[0:5] == "vert ": ...
 
@@ -279,8 +279,8 @@ Python has two ways to compare values ``a == b`` and ``a is b``, The difference
 In cases where you know you are checking for the same value which is referenced from multiple places, ``is`` is faster.
 
 
-Time You're Code
-----------------
+Time Your Code
+--------------
 
 While developing a script its good to time it to be aware of any changes in performance, this can be done simply.
 
index be4ccdbcf72afe34ae067fcb885be90c78b1b694..c81d2ebe5ef589e10c21d69a181ec476c3b16ffa 100644 (file)
@@ -262,8 +262,7 @@ To run the script:
 
 #. Click on the button **Run Script**.
 
-#. Move you're mouse into the 3D view, press spacebar for the operator search
-   menu, and type "Simple".
+#. Move your mouse into the 3D view, press spacebar for the operator search menu, and type "Simple".
 
 #. Click on the "Simple Operator" item found in search.
 
index 5de7ded7674b1887161684000d4377bfa044de7f..491e97208dc34d96a062e3eb3b6f6c62a7499bc0 100644 (file)
@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ When writing python scripts, it's useful to have a terminal open, this is not th
 
 There are 3 main uses for the terminal, these are:
 
-* You can see the output of ``print()`` as you're script runs, which is useful to view debug info.
+* You can see the output of ``print()`` as your script runs, which is useful to view debug info.
 
 * The error trace-back is printed in full to the terminal which won't always generate an error popup in blender's user interface (depending on how the script is executed).
 
@@ -135,15 +135,15 @@ Once the script is running properly in background mode, you'll want to check the
 * if the results can be displayed as text - print them or write them to a file.
 
 
-This can take a little time to setup, but it can be well worth the effort to reduce the time it takes to test changes - you can even have blender running the script ever few seconds with a viewer updating the results, so no need to leave you're text editor to see changes.
+This can take a little time to setup, but it can be well worth the effort to reduce the time it takes to test changes - you can even have blender running the script ever few seconds with a viewer updating the results, so no need to leave your text editor to see changes.
 
 
 Use External Tools
 ==================
 
-When there are no readily available python modules to perform specific tasks it's worth keeping in mind you may be able to have python execute an external command on you're data and read the result back in.
+When there are no readily available python modules to perform specific tasks it's worth keeping in mind you may be able to have python execute an external command on your data and read the result back in.
 
-Using external programs adds an extra dependency and may limit who can use the script but to quickly setup you're own custom pipeline or writing one-off scripts this can be handy.
+Using external programs adds an extra dependency and may limit who can use the script but to quickly setup your own custom pipeline or writing one-off scripts this can be handy.
 
 Examples include:
 
@@ -157,7 +157,7 @@ Examples include:
 Bundled Python & Extensions
 ===========================
 
-The Blender releases distributed from blender.org include a complete python installation on all platforms, this has the disadvantage that any extensions you have installed in you're systems python wont be found by blender.
+The Blender releases distributed from blender.org include a complete python installation on all platforms, this has the disadvantage that any extensions you have installed in your systems python wont be found by blender.
 
 There are 2 ways around this:
 
@@ -166,8 +166,8 @@ There are 2 ways around this:
 * copy the extensions into blender's python sub-directory so blender can access them, you could also copy the entire python installation into blenders sub-directory, replacing the one blender comes with. This works as long as the python versions match and the paths are created in the same relative locations. Doing this has the advantage that you can redistribute this bundle to others with blender and/or the game player, including any extensions you rely on.
 
 
-Drop Into a Python Interpreter in You're Script
-===============================================
+Drop Into a Python Interpreter in Your Script
+=============================================
 
 In the middle of a script you may want to inspect some variables, run some function and generally dig about to see whats going on.
 
@@ -187,7 +187,7 @@ If you want to access both global and local variables do this...
    code.interact(local=namespace)
 
 
-The next example is an equivalent single line version of the script above which is easier to paste into you're code:
+The next example is an equivalent single line version of the script above which is easier to paste into your code:
 
 .. code-block:: python